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Arborescent Thinking...These difficulties are partly due to what specialists call arborescent thinking. “ Normal people develop logical reasoning through linear, sequential thinking.

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Arborescent Thinking...These difficulties are partly due to what specialists call arborescent thinking. “ Normal people develop logical reasoning through linear, sequential thinking.

High potential? Parents want to know
Psychological examinations are increasingly common to identify gifted children. It’s a trend that hides a complex reality, as gifted children can also be prone to failure.


Enéa gets good marks. But she disturbs the class, talks a lot and complains often. This situation surprises her mother, Stéphanie Laurent. At home, this seven-year old schoolgirl from Lausanne is quiet, responsible and not the type to bother others. What’s wrong? School. Enéa is bored. A teacher friend advised Stéphanie Laurent to enter her daughter for tests to determine whether she was “high potential”. And the result came back positive.

High potential (HP) children are referred to as gifted or precocious. They are sometimes compared with child prodigies, which is one reason for the increase in requests for psychological examinations. “Interest in these tests is growing,” states Pierre Fumeaux, a child psychiatrist at Lausanne University Hospital who is currently conducting a study on the subject. “A few years ago when parents or teachers had to deal with a difficult student, they would ask the doctor if the child was hyperactive. Now the term ‘high potential’ has taken centre stage in the media.” Contrary to popular belief, gifted is not always synonymous with success. High potential children can also be prone to failure.

A different brain

To be diagnosed as “HP”, an individual has to obtain a score of at least 130 on IQ tests. “But the score isn’t enough,” explains Claudia Jankech, a psychotherapist in Lausanne specialised in child and teenager psychology. “We also need to understand their family and social context and their personality.”

Surprisingly, a high number of HP children have trouble in school. “When it’s too easy for them, they get used to being on autopilot,” says the psychologist. “They’ve never learnt how to learn.” These difficulties are partly due to what specialists call arborescent thinking. “Normal people develop logical reasoning through linear, sequential thinking. However, the thought process in HP children is like fireworks exploding with ideas and impressive intuition. They can solve complex equations but will have difficulty explaining how they came up with the answer,” explains Pierre Fumeaux.

Surprisingly, a high number of HP children have trouble in school. “When it’s too easy for them, they get used to being on autopilot,” says the psychologist. “They’ve never learnt how to learn.”

Studies suggest that HP children’s brains function differently. Information moves better between the two cerebral hemispheres. “We assume that they use both their left and right brains easily and have excellent abilities in both logic and creativity,” says the child psychiatrist. “Other work has shown that HP children can more easily juggle with concepts and think in the abstract, such as performing mental calculations. “In a functional MRI, a dye is injected to highlight the areas of the brain with the highest blood flow.

Using a scanner, we can then see which areas are activated,” Pierre Fumeaux explains. “A stimulus or given task will activate certain areas of the brain in normal individuals. In HP children, sometimes several larger areas are activated at the same time,” he adds. These indicators help doctors understand how an HP mind works. “But our knowledge in neuroscience remains limited,” the researcher admits. “Being high potential is not an illness, but a special cognitive ability. And that’s not a priority for researchers.”

INTERVIEW: “The methods of diagnosis are debatable”

In a survey conducted on gifted children, the French sociologist Wilfried Lignier noted that specialists do not agree about the tests designed to diagnose giftedness.

In Vivo You observe that most gifted children don’t have difficulty in school or psychological problems. Why then do parents have them take tests?
Wilfried Lignier These parents are very concerned that their children will face difficulties, whereas they actually have every chance of success. They think that the school’s assessment is not enough. Psychology offers greater legitimacy for their concerns.


IV You approach giftedness as a “debated and debatable” issue. Why?
WL Many psychologists don’t recognise giftedness mainly because they doubt the credibility of IQ tests. These tests are meant to assess something other than academic skills, but in form they are quite similar to the exercises performed in school. Furthermore, children also have this impression. After the test is over, some say that they did well in the “maths” section, referring to the logical reasoning, or the “language” section, referring to the vocabulary. Being so similar to exercises done in school, these tests contradict the idea that intelligence isn’t the same as academic performance. Yet most of the social repercussions expected from test results are based on the idea that they tell a truth that school does not.

IV You show that the diagnosis swings in favour of one gender. How do you explain that high potential is more often diagnosed in boys?
WL Parents tend to express greater concern about their future, as it more readily carries their hopes of upward social mobility. The fact that boys have greater chances of having “symptoms”, such as openly expressing their boredom or not being able to stay still, also plays a role.

Hyper-sensitivity

HP children also typically have emotional characteristics featuring high sensitivity or a high level of empathy. Stéphanie Laurent’s two other children, boys, have also been diagnosed as high potential. “Nathael, age six, cries at Christmas because poor people are cold and have nothing to eat.” His hyper-sensitivity distresses him. “It can take on huge proportions. At one point, Mathys, age eight, felt unreasonable fear because he knew that there was a core on fire at the centre of the earth.” Myriam Bickle Graz, a developmental paediatrician at Lausanne University Hospital who wrote a thesis on the subject, says, “The children seen at consultations were often overwhelmed by their emotions. For some, it was incredibly difficult; they have no filter,” she explains. “The fear of death, for example, comes very early.” They develop symptoms such as anxiety, sleep disorders, strained relationships with other children and aggression.

THE HAPPIEST HP CHILDREN ARE THOSE WHO ARE NOT IDENTIFIED AS SUCH AND MANAGE TO ADAPT.
As in the Laurent family, there are often several gifted siblings. “Not all siblings are necessarily going to be HP, but there is a certain degree of genetic heritage. However, that hasn’t been proven scientifically,” explains Myriam Bickle Graz. “It remains a clinical observation.”

Although some high potential children suffer, the majority of them lead normal lives. As summed up by Pierre Fumeaux, “the happiest HP children are those who are not identified as such and manage to adapt.”

Arborescent thinking deploying in several directions, simultaneously, extremely fast and without boundaries. While it is a important source of creativity, it also implies: Difficulties to identify relevant information; all these thoughts in all directions may be confusing when the child is faced with a question, a problem or a task at school, An absolute need to organise these thoughts within a sturdy frame so that the child feels affectively, emotionally and socially secure. A “global” information processing system, with analogic and intuitive thinking. While it enables a very rich and deep understanding, with photographic memory, it also implies: Serious difficulties to adapt to the traditional schooling systems which treat information in details and sequentially (one thing after the other), An inability to develop arguments or justify their reasoning. Gifted children usually can’t explain their results, they consider the answers obvious, they know intuitively. The necessity to use in parallel the traditional school learning methods and their own knowledge aquisition systems; they do not want to feel useless, rejected or stupid. A thinking mode that needs meaning to function and complexity to develop and bloom. While it is an endless source of information data stored in an exceptional memory, it also implies: Difficulties or even refusal to acquire skills or information which they consider useless, too simple or not exciting enough to justify their attention and efforts, Constant challenges of established rules and norms, to satisfy their needs for meaning, To “learn how to learn” while taming their impatience through inventive and stimulating methodologies, with deep enrichment on all subjects. A way of thinking constantly integrating affective aspects of its environment. While it is a rich incentive to learning, it also implies: Frustration, even rejection of some teachers whom they see as incompetent in their teaching methods or behaviours, Excessive, even pathological reactions if these children, who try to master their environment and their variations, cannot find reassurance. They are scared by what they do not understand and they know, from a very young age, many things that they cannot put in perspective due to their short life experience. A need for constant reassurance on their learning progress, with a learning methodology adapted to their needs and offering a long-term continuity and homogeneity, thus reducing affective disruptions as much as possible.

anhugar.wifeo.com/arborescent-way-of-thinking.php A difficulty encountered by many gifed children is the fact that they think in an arborescent way instead of a linear one. The usual teaching methods are linear - when forced to learn in that mode, gifted children need to make a lot of efforts to voluntarily slow-down their “processing” thinking pace.

Arborescent thinking is very adequate for gifted people; it allows them to use all their mental capacities and their knowledge simultaneously. However, it needs to be guided and framed otherwise their thinking takes them far away from the subject of that day.

Here is an example from Jeanne Siaud-Fachin: The teacher gives a spelling test. He dictates “the boat sails on the sea”. The gifted child will initially visualize an image of a boat on the sea before seeing the sentence made of 6 words. Following the image, her thoughts will go in all directions: well, it is not a good idea to sail today because there is a lot of wind are there any people on that boat? my friend Frank owns a boat, he’s lucky but his parents are divorced, that is not fun I hope my parents will never get divorced yet, Frank has twice as many presents for Christmas now that he has 2 homes which reminds me, I have not yet prepared a wish-list for Christmas etc. While the other children have finished writing the initial sentance, the gifted child does not remember it at all and if she’s pressed, she may write the last sentence that went through her head “ I have not yet prepared a wish-list for Christmas ”.

Also

www.talentdifferent.com/la-pensee-en-arborescence-901.htm...

www.asep-suisse.org/joomla/index.php?option=com_docman&am... (pdf) How to help such children overcome their ‘handicap’

From the main link in the title (translated from the French by Google Chrome, I think): Surprisingly, a high number of high potential children have trouble in school. “When it’s too easy for them, they get used to being on autopilot,” says the psychologist. “They’ve never learnt how to learn.” These difficulties are partly due to what specialists call arborescent thinking. “Normal people develop logical reasoning through linear, sequential thinking. However, the thought process in HP children is like fireworks exploding with ideas and impressive intuition. They can solve complex equations but will have difficulty explaining how they came up with the answer,” explains Pierre Fumeaux.

Surprisingly, a high number of HP children have trouble in school. “When it’s too easy for them, they get used to being on autopilot,” says the psychologist. “They’ve never learnt how to learn.”

Studies suggest that HP children’s brains function differently. Information moves better between the two cerebral hemispheres. “We assume that they use both their left and right brains easily and have excellent abilities in both logic and creativity,” says the child psychiatrist. “Other work has shown that HP children can more easily juggle with concepts and think in the abstract, such as performing mental calculations. “In a functional MRI, a dye is injected to highlight the areas of the brain with the highest blood flow.

sony carlzeisslens carlzeiss arborescent thinking people reasoning sequential high potential psychological examination tree hp precocious prodigy psychology psychiatrist hyperactive failure iq test 149 brain mental calculator calculation area knowledge mind neuroscience logical symptomatic hypersensibility boundary genetic heritage perspective painting streetart springtime flowers personality impressive intuition solve complex equations difficulty explaining cerebral hemispheres cognitive ability

This Cauliflower & Chia Seed Pizza Crust Protects Your Brain & Heart & Prevents Cancer

healthylife2 posted a photo:

This Cauliflower & Chia Seed Pizza Crust Protects Your Brain & Heart & Prevents Cancer

This Cauliflower & Chia Seed Pizza Crust Protects Your Brain & Heart & Prevents Cancer

For a lot of you who are reading this article, pizza may be your favorite food, but certainly not the healthiest meal out there. However, though you may associate pizza with weight gain, it is not always the case.

In fact, there are ways to prepare your own homemade healthy pizza that will not contribute to inflammation or worsen your digestion. Thanks to today’s article, you will learn that swapping the wheat for the dough with cauliflower and reducing the presence of dairy in the toppings is the key to healthy pizza crust.


Believe it or not, cauliflower crust is the new thing and everyone is using it to prepare and enjoy a healthy and tasty meal. Continue reading the article to learn why cauliflower crust is good for you…

Cauliflower Crust: Why It Is Good for You?
Cauliflower, as you may already know, is a cruciferous veggie which is abundant in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties like sulforaphane. Its compounds were found to be beneficial in the fight against breast, colon, lung, prostate, liver, and cervical cancer by triggering cancer cell death and averting the spread of the cells.

When you consume cauliflower regularly, you are providing your body with important nutrients, including folate and vitamins B6, C, and K, as well as with potassium, manganese, riboflavin, and pantothenic acid.

It is important to note that cauliflower is great for pregnant women because it can change the hippocampal pyramidal cells in the foetal brain and better the cognitive function, as well as the learning and memory.

What’s more, it will regulate the gut bacteria and avert bacterial overgrowth and improve your digestion.

The recipe for cauliflower crust also contains chia seeds which are rich in magnesium, iron, calcium, fiber, and omega-3s. The tryptophan in chia seeds will elevate your satiety and better your weight management. When consumed regularly, chia seeds will better your blood pressure, decrease the bad cholesterol, balance your blood sugar, and fight off insulin resistance.

We bet you are eager to learn the cauliflower crust recipe, right? Check it out below!

DIY Cauliflower Pizza Crust Recipe:
foodsandhealthylifee.blogspot.com/2019/04/this-cauliflowe...

this cauliflower chia seed pizza crust protects your brain heart prevents cancer

Ashcan Alley S8#137 : The Muse!

Weldon Alley posted a photo:

Ashcan Alley S8#137 : The Muse!

A Real Abstraction!

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kill

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kill

I am killing negative thinking
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www.youtube.com/channel/UCImi0_-VLKyYR6gb8fsBVkA

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tbi

colecenterforhealing posted a photo:

tbi

Here's another study that shows the benefit of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) on traumatic brain injury (TBI).

The study notes that TBI is a growing public health problem in the world and the leading cause of death in Chinese adults aged <40 years. Oxygen supply to the brain is often insufficient after TBI, and then results in decreased energy production, which leads to the death of neurons (brain cells).
The research shows that HBOT reversed the damaging changes caused by acute TBI and greatly reduced the number of neurons that died as a result of the TBI. In other words, HBOT has the ability to reverse brain damage.

I'll say it again: if you've had any type of concussion, stroke or TBI, adding HBOT to your treatment will greatly benefit your recovery.

Hui He, et. al. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy attenuates neuronal apoptosis induced by traumatic brain injury via Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2019; 15: 369–374.
Published online 2019 Jan 25. doi: 10.2147/NDT.S183632

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Solved Rubik's cube 7x7x7 on white background with green, white and orange sides

wuestenigel posted a photo:

Solved Rubik's cube 7x7x7 on white background with green, white and orange sides

✅ Marco Verch is a Professional Photographer and Speaker from Cologne. 👆 This image is available under Creative Commons 2.0. Please link to the original photo and the license. 📝 License for use outside of the Creative Commons is available by request.

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Gelöster Rubik's Cube Zauberwürfel mit 7x7x7 Feldern in orange, blaugrün und weiß auf weißem Hintergrund

verchmarco posted a photo:

Gelöster Rubik's Cube Zauberwürfel mit 7x7x7 Feldern in orange, blaugrün und weiß auf weißem Hintergrund

✅ Marco Verch is a Professional Photographer and Speaker from Cologne. 👆 This image can be used under Creative Commons 2.0. Please link to the original photo and the license.

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